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Kazuhide Nara / Professor / Division of Environmental Sciences
Department of Natural Environmental Studies / Evalutation of Natural Environments / Forest Ecology, Microbial Ecology, Molecular Phylogeny, Conservation Biology
http://www.edu.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp/nara_lab/

Career Summary
1991: Bachelor of Agriculture, Faculty of Agriculture, The University of Tokyo
1993: Master of Agriculture, Graduate School of Agriculture, The University of Tokyo
1993-1994: Researcher, Forestry and Forest Product Research Institute
1994-2010: Assistant Professor, The University of Tokyo
2004: PhD (Agriculture), The University of Tokyo
2011: Associate Professor, The University of Tokyo
2016-: Professor, The University of Tokyo
Educational Activities
Graduate school: Bio-environmental Science I, Seminar in Bio-environmental Studies I, Seminar in Bio-environmental Studies II, Experiment in Bio-Environmental Studies I, Experiment in Bio-Environmental Studies II, Fieldwork in Forest and Grassland Ecology I, Fieldwork in Forest and Grassland Ecology II, Advanced Seminar on Bio-environmental Studies I, Advanced Seminar on Bio-environmental Studies II, Advanced Seminar on Bio-environmental Studies III, Advanced Experiments in Bio-environmental Studies I, Advanced Experiments in Bio-environmental Studies II, Advanced Experiments in Bio-environmental Studies III, Advanced Practice in Bio-environmental Studies I, Advanced Practice in Bio-environmental Studies II, Advanced Practice in Bio-environmental Studies III
Research Activities
My research focuses on mycorrhizal symbioses, which are mutually beneficial relationships between plants and fungi. Findings include the mechanism of plant growth promotion by mycorrhizal fungi, spatio-temporal nutrient movements in mycorrhizal symbioses, structures of mycorrhizal fungal communities, global diversity patterns of mycorrhizal fungi, and the utilization of mycorrhizal symbioses for reforestation in disturbed areas in Asia.
Recent research revealed that there are at least 20 truffle species (Tuber spp.), most of which are potentially new species, in Japan. Other research interests are the coevolution between Rhizopogon and Pinaceae, phylogeography of truffle-like fungi, and the diversity and functions of rhizosphere bacteria.
Literature
1) Kinoshita, A., Sasaki, H., Nara, K. Phylogeny and diversity of Japanese truffles (Tuber spp.) inferred from sequences of four nuclear loci. Mycologia, in press
2) Tedersoo, L., Nara, K. (2010) General latitudinal gradient of biodiversity is reversed in ectomycorrhizal fungi. New Phytologist 185: 351-354
3) Ishida, T. A., Nara, K., Ma, S., Takano, T., Liu, S. (2009) Ectomycorrhizal fungal community in alkaline-saline soil in northeastern China. Mycorrhiza 19: 329-335
4) Tanaka, M., Nara, K. (2009) Phylogenetic diversity of non-nodulating Rhizobium associated with pine ectomycorrhizae. FEMS Microbiology Ecology 69: 329-343
5) Nara, K. (2009) Spores of ectomycorrhizal fungi: ecological strategies for germination and dormancy. New Phytologist 181: 245-248
6) Ishida, T. A., Nara, K., Tanaka, M., Kinoshita, A., Hogetsu, T. (2008) Germination and infectivity of ectomycorrhizal fungal spores in relation to ecological traits during primary succession. New Phytologist 180: 491-500
7) He, X. H., Nara, K. (2007) Element biofortification: can mycorrhizas potentially offer a more effective and sustainable pathway to curb human malnutrition? Trends in Plant Science 12: 331-333
8) Ishida, T. A., Nara, K., Hogetsu, T. (2007) Host effects on ectomycorrhizal fungal communities: insight from eight host species in mixed conifer-broadleaf forests. New Phytologist 174: 430-440
9) Lian, C., Narimatsu, M., Nara, K., Hogetsu, T. (2006) Reproduction patterns of Tricholoma matsutake in a natural Pinus densiflora forest: correspondence between above- and below-ground genets, association to multiple host trees, and alteration of existing ectomycorrhizal communities. New Phytologist 171: 825-836
10) Nara, K. (2006) Pioneer dwarf willow may facilitate tree succession by providing late colonizers with compatible ectomycorrhizal fungi in a primary successional volcanic desert. New Phytologist 171: 187-198
11) Nara, K. (2006) Ectomycorrhizal networks and seedling establishment during early primary succession. New Phytologist 169: 169-178
12) Wu, B., Nara, K., Hogetsu, T. (2005) Genetic structure of Cenococcum geophilum populations in primary successional volcanic deserts on Mount Fuji as revealed by microsatellite markers. New Phytologist 165: 285-293
13) Nara, K., Hogetsu, T. (2004) Ectomycorrhizal fungi on established shrubs facilitate subsequent seedling establishment of successional plant species. Ecology 85: 1700-1707
14) Nara, K., Nakaya, H., Wu, B., Zhou, Z., Hogetsu, T. (2003) Underground primary succession of ectomycorrhizal fungi in a volcanic desert on Mount Fuji. New Phytologist 159: 743-756
15) Zhou, Z., Miwa, M., Nara, K., Wu, B., Nakaya, H., Lian, C., Miyashita, N., Oishi, R., Maruta, E., Hogetsu, T. (2003) Patch establishment and development of a clonal plant, Polygonum cuspidatum, on Mount Fuji. Molecular Ecology 12: 1361-1373
16) Nara, K., Nakaya, H., Hogetsu, T. (2003) Ectomycorrhizal sporocarp succession and production during early primary succession on Mount Fuji. New Phytologist 158:193-206
17) Lian, C., Oishi, R., Miyashita, N., Nara, K., Nakaya, H., Zhou, Z., Wu, B., Hogetsu, T. (2003) Genetic structure and reproduction dynamics of Salix reinii during primary succession on Mount Fuji, as revealed by nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite analysis. Molecular Ecology 12: 609-618
18) Wu, B., Nara, K., Hogetsu, T. (2001) Can 14C-labeled photosynthetic products move between Pinus densiflora seedlings linked by ectomycorrhizal mycelia? New Phytologist 149:137-146
Other Activities
The Japanese Forest Society, The Ecological Society of Japan, The Mycological Society of Japan, The Japanese Society of Forest Environment, Ecological Society of America, Mycological Society of America
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Future Plan
Ecosystems rely on biological interactions, through which a unique function of an organism can affect the whole ecosystem. My lab is using various research approaches to study ecology, diversity, symbioses, coevolution, and the functions of all sorts of terrestrial macro- and micro-organisms. We are also trying to develop an effective reforestation technique by using unique bio-functions found in our scientific research.
Messages to Students
Enjoy science!
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