spacer


Aya Suzuki / Lecturer / Division of Environmental Studies
Department of International Studies / / Development Economics, Agricultural Economics

Career Summary
1997: Bachelor of Arts, Waseda University
2002: Master of International Development Studies, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies
2008: Ph.D. in Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of California, Davis
2008-2011: Faculty Fellow, Foundation for Advanced Studies on International Development
2008-2012: Assistant Professor, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies
2012-Present: Lecturer, Department of International Studies, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo
Educational Activities
Graduate school: Applied Econometrics, Development Economics
Research Activities
My main research interest is determining how developing countries can reduce poverty levels. Creating employment opportunities and developing industries is crucial, and therefore I study agricultural and industrial development. I mainly conduct empirical research using micro-level data with a focus on a particular industry. Current research topics include:

(1) The export pineapple industry in Ghana, (2) the cut flower industry in Kenya and Ethiopia, (3) the impact evaluation of managerial training in Vietnam, and (4) the export frozen fish/shrimp industry in Vietnam.
Literature
1) Suzuki, Jarvis, and Sexton. "Partial Vertical Integration, Risk Shifting, and Product Rejection in the High-value Export Supply Chain: The Ghana Pineapple Sector." World Development Vol. 39 No. 9 (2011):1611-1623.

2) Mano, Yamano, Suzuki, and Matsumoto. "Local Personal Networks in Employment and the Development of Labor Markets: Evidence from the Cut Flower Industry in Ethiopia." World Development Vol. 39 No. 10 (2011): 1760-1770.

3) Sonobe, Suzuki, and Otsuka. "Volume IV: KAIZEN for Managerial Skills Improvement in Small and Medium Enterprises" in Light Manufacturing in Africa: Targeted Policies to Enhance Private Investment and Create Jobs. edited by Dinh, Palmade, Chandra, and Cossar. The World Bank, Washington DC: 2012.
Other Activities
Agricultural and Applied Economics Association
Japanese Economic Association
spacer
Future Plan
I plan to continue studying the effect of the food quality/safety standards of importing countries on the producers in developing countries.
Messages to Students
The most valuable thing I learned in graduate school was how to think objectively and critically. I hope that students will use their time to train themselves and develop their human capital, which will be useful for their own future as well as for society at large.
top