Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo

Research Groups

Masashi Takigawa Group

Group of Solid State Physics (The Institute for Solid State Physics) [New Materials Science]

Masashi Takigawa Group

Inquiry

Home Page , TEL / FAX : +81-(0)4-7136-3225 , e-mail: masashi@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp


Research never goes as expected. It is exciting to
find something unexpected, puzzling, or hard to understand.

If you encounter such an experience, stick to the problem until you finally solve it. What you get may be a great discovery moving our science forward. In the undergraduate course, I joined projects in a high energy physics lab working with many colleagues. But I chose condensed matter physics in the graduate school because it seemed to allow me to pursue physics based on my own plans and ideas.

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), which is the primary experimental technique in our lab, provides us with the microscopic “eyes” to look through materials and to watch the behavior of electronic charge and spin. By using NMR, we are trying to discover novel quantum state of matter brought by strong electronic correlation and quantum fluctuations such as exotic orders of electronic spin and charge, unconventional superconducting Cooper pairing, spin liquids, and quantum phase transition induced by applying strong magnetic field or pressure.

Professor Masashi Takigawa

Profile

Professor Masashi Takigawa

  • 1978 B. A. Univ. of Tokyo, Physics
  • 1983 Ph. D. Univ. of Tokyo, Physics Technical Associate, Institute for Solid State Physics (ISSP) Univ. of Tokyo
  • 1987 Limited Term Staff Member, Los Alamos National Lab
  • 1990 Research Staff Member, IBM T. J. Watson Research Center
  • 1997 Professor, ISSP Univ. of Tokyo

Introduction of the study

Introduction of the study

We use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as the major experimental tool to investigate various phenomena caused by strong electronic correlations and quantum fluctuations such as exotic superconductivity, unconventional order of electronic spin, orbital and charge, quantum phase transition in quantum spin and strongly correlated systems induced by high magnetic field and high pressure. Because of the magnetic and electric hyperfine interaction between nuclear magnetic and quadrupole moments and surrounding electrons, NMR is a powerful tool for microscopic investigation of the ordering and fluctuations of multiple degrees of freedom of electrons such as spin, charge and orbital. Current research topics in our lab include

(1) Ground states, dynamics, and quantum phase transitions in frustrated spin systems.
(2) Exotic superconductors and quantum transitions under high pressure.
(3) Ordering and fluctuations of electronic multiopoles.

Message from a senior

Shun Takano

Shun Takano

Prof. Takigawa supports individual students kindly and he is very easy to talk to. Our conversation in the coffee time after lunch starts from daily topics but sometimes ends up with recent research news. In our department, there are a variety of people with different background. It is stimulating to learn what is going on in different areas of science.

Shun Takano