Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo

Research Groups

Satoru Nakatsuji Group

Group of Solid State Physics (The Institute for Solid State Physics) [New Materials Science]

Satoru Nakatsuji Group

Inquiry

Home Page , TEL : +81-(0)4-7136-3240 FAX : +81-(0)4-7136-3241 e-mail: satoru@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp


New materials research leads to the discovery of new phenomena.
By learning the state of art techniques of both synthesis and low
temperature measurements, you may discover your own material,
which shows new functions, paving a path for new technology.

The discovery of new phenomena is at the forefront of research in condensed matter physics. This is particularly true for the inorganic materials, which provide an important basis in current electronic and information technology. They have been central subjects of basic research because quantum correlations among the Avogadro numbers of electrons lead to exotic macroscopic phenomena such as superconductivity, quantum Hall effect, and quantum criticality. Thus, the search for new materials that exhibit new characteristics is one of the most exciting and important projects in the materials research. We have synthesized new materials in so-called strongly correlated electron systems including transition metal compounds and heavy fermion intermetallic compounds. Our interest lies in macroscopic quantum phenomena such as novel quantum criticality, exotic superconductivity and quantum spin liquid in magnetic semiconductors.

 Professor Satoru Nakatsuji

Profile

Professor Satoru Nakatsuji

  • 1996: Graduated, Department of Metal Science, Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University
  • 1998-2001: Research Fellow for Young Scientist of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Kyoto University, Department of Physics
  • 2001: Doctor of Science from Kyoto University
  • 2001: Postdoctoral Research Fellow of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahasee, Florida U.S.A.
  • 2001-2003: Postdoctoral Research Fellow for Research Abroad of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahasee, Florida U.S.A.
  • 2003: Lecturer, Faculty of Science, Kyoto University
  • 2006: Associate Professor, Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo
  • 2016: Professor, Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo

Introduction of the study

Introduction of the study

One of our primary interests is the search for new materials that exhibit new quantum phenomena. In our group, we synthesize new materials in so-called strongly correlated electron systems including transition metal compounds and heavy fermion intermetallics. Currently we study, (1) low-temperature electronic and magnetic properties of the new transition metal compounds, (2) quantum spin-orbital liquid in two-dimensional magnetic semiconductors, (3) exotic superconductivity and quantum critical phenomena in heavy fermion systems (4) macroscopic topological effects in frustrated magnets. We also study novel Hall effects that arise owing to a complex nano-spin-structure, which allows antiferromagnets to function as a non-volatile memory without using rare-earth or precious metals.

New materials research often leads to the discovery of new phenomena. By learning the techniques of both synthesis and low temperature measurements, you may discover your own material and be filled with surprise. Through our weekly seminars, in which we review the techniques employed at the forefront of condensed matter physics, you will gain the insights to understand novel physics principles, which can then be clarified by your own experiments. I believe that this will be one of the experiences that you will come to treasure in your life.

Introduction of the study

Quantum critical superconductor β-YbAlB4 discovered in our laboratory
(Left top) Crystal structure. 4f-electrons of Yb atoms exhibit novel quantum magnetism and exotic superconductivity.
(Left bottom) Single crystals grown by a flux method.
(Right) Phase diagram determined based on electrical resistivity measurements. A novel quantum critical state (yellow) emerges under zero magnetic field.
(Inset) Exotic superconductivity emerges from the novel quantum critical state, only in ultrapure single crystals.

Message from a senior

Akito Sakai

Group Photo

Hi! We are enjoying experiments such as crystal growth, and low temperature measurement. In our lab, you will perform cutting-edge research by using a wide variety of instruments and techniques from the?beginning, so there are many chances to make a great discovery!

You will work together with?our members, consisting of professional researchers, experienced senior?students, and also a number of our?collaborators visiting us from?around the world. You will?learn experimental techniques and research methods through your own study. Let's enjoy science together in our laboratory, and you will find yourself leading the world by your research!