Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo

Research Groups

Mikk Lippmaa Group

Group of Solid State Physics (The Institute for Solid State Physics) [Nanoscale Science]

Mikk Lippmaa Group

Inquiry

Home Page , TEL : +81-(0)4-7136-3315 , FAX : +81-(0)4-7136-3319 , e-mail: lippmaa@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp


Visit laboratories, look at many
research projects, talk to friends,
and take the time to understand.

I encourage students to look at many research projects, talk to friends, visit their laboratories, and take the time to understand what other groups are studying. Even for those who decide to stay in academic positions after graduation from graduate school, simple blind chance has as much influence on the topic that you will be working on ten years later, as any personal preferences or wishes. It is therefore useful to know about many fields related to materials, physics, and chemistry, to be able to choose wisely when making future career decisions.

Associate Professor Mikk Lippmaa

Profile

Associate Professor Mikk Lippmaa

Graduated in 1989 from Tartu University in Estonia. Received a Ph.D in 1994 and Dr.Tech in 1995 from Helsinki University of Technology in Finland. Worked as a senior researcher of Natural Science Division at Academy of Finland in 1994, and a lecturer at Helsinki University of Technology in 1995. Worked on growth dynamics of oxides as a JSPS fellow at Tokyo Institute of Technology from 1996 to 1999. Developed combinatorial thin film growth techniques within the COMET project since 1999. Joined the Institute for Solid State Physics at the University of Tokyo in 2001. Currently studying ultrathin oxide structure and electronic properties of oxide heterointerfaces.

Introduction of the study

Introduction of the study

Thin films, nanostructures, and thin interface layers in epitaxial heterostructures offer interesting ways of controlling the electronic phases that appear in oxide materials. The presence of multiple different phases that can be stabilized in oxides by small changes in carrier density, slight lattice distortions or by various external applied fields has brought about the possibility of developing useful new functional electronic devices for sensing and data storage.

The purpose of our work is to study the phase transition mechanisms in various oxide materials in restricted geometries. In most cases, we use transport measurements to probe for the presence of metal-insulator transitions under various forms of external excitations, such as electrostatic carrier accumulation in field-effect and ferroelectric devices or by applying controlled levels of strain on thin film materials. Some of the examples that we are currently working on are the strain-driven metal-insulator transition in vanadates, generation of two-dimensional high-mobility quantum wells in titanates, and the stabilization of ferromagnetic order in ultrathin manganites. Our latest interest is in photocatalytic oxide materials for collecting sunlight and using the energy of the Sun to generate clean fuels, like hydrogen.

Message from a senior

Thomas Peltier

Thomas Peltier

Lippmaa-sensei is always ready to help his students and willing to make them overcome the problems met during their research. The laboratory offers a large number of apparatus allowing the development of your research in the best conditions. Moreover, the small size of the laboratory leads to a really good management of the students which eases your research. AMS gives you the opportunity to face interesting challenges and leads you to a better understanding of material science.

Introduction of the study<